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an israeli soldier, palestinian militant and dozens of civilians. egypt's foreign minister announced this in cairo alongside secretary of state, hillary clinton. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, binyamin netanyahu, confirmed the deal saying that he had agreed to give the cease-fire a chance after speaking with president obama. secretary of state, hillary clinton said the united states and egypt will work together in working toward long-term peace in the middle east. listen. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today if a cease-fire in gaza, and now a broader calm returns. >> the truce is hours after a bomb tore through a bus near israel's defense ministry in tel aviv. the explosion injured two dozen people, hamas leaders praised the attack but did not take responsibility. in gaza, israel struck more than 100 targets including hamas government buildings. officials in the palestinian territory set to strike and killed to dozen including to children. we have coverage from jonathan hunt at the united nations but, first, we go to david lee miller on the ground in southern
to say the agreements with israel regarding the easing of the blockade and with egypt, are very vague. they're being negotiated today. i mean they're an agreement to, to negotiate things about them. which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary, they may be very, very limited, and they may never materialize at all what hamas has gained is first of all a certain diplomatic breakthrough. the amir of qatar went there before this happened. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there the foreign minister of durky and foreign minister of tunisia went there. the prime minister of turkey may go. what hamas has been able to do is bring -- >> break out of its diplomatic cage a little bit. that's the benefit. the other thing is that this is a benefit to the people, the hamas factions in gaza who are fighting an internal power struggle with the external leadership that used to be based in damascus and is now disbursed all over the world. i think for different factions in hamas they've achieved things politically for themselves. the people of gaza may be in a sense o
they do. we should distinguish those two. >> with israel and egypt, the blockade is very vague. they are being negotiated today. there's an agreement to negotiate things about them, which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary. they may be very, very limited and they may never materialize at all. what hamas has gained is, first of all, a certain diplomatic breakthrough. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there, the foreign minister of turkey went there. what hamas has been able to do is -- >> international recognition. >> yeah. break out of its diplomatic cage a bit. that's the benefit. the other thing, this is a benefit to the people, the hamas people in gaza, fighting an internal power with the external leadership that used to be in damascus and is now dispursed all over the place. they achieved things for themselves. the people of gaza maybe in a sense of euphoria, but there's a sense of hangover. there ought to be, as there was, after cass led in 2008 and 2009, a clear contrast with a better situation. today there isn't one. that's the tra
is in cairo where she met with president mohamed morsi of egypt who's mediating the discussions. as secretary clinton carries the official white house message there is new attention being paid to the president's strategic options in the region. "the washington post" writes president obama's decision to send his top diplomat on an emergency middle east peace making mission tuesday marked an administration shift to a more active vist role in the region's affairs and offered clues to how he may use the political elbow room afforded by a second term. beyond a cease-fire agreement, the president could try to throw his political clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both
, thank you. >> gregg: contest in the background on egypt's president morsi. he was elected in june of this year after a revolution overthrowing president hosni mubarak. he is head 6 muslim brotherhood. he is the first freely elected president and first islamist to be head of an arab state. they accuse him of trying to monopolize powers, the courts and media and parliament and in the end, sharia law, imposing strict islamic principles. >> heather: it raises new questions coming one day after egypt help broker a cease-fire in the gaza strip. former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. john bolton joined us earlier to weigh in saying it's no coincidence. >> he didn't wait but one day before moving here. so whether he had a wink and a nod from president obama or whether whether he felt emboldened in the wake of the cease-fire to believe the u.s. would not criticize him or do anything major to stop this power grab, i think we'll have to find out in the next few days. the timing is not coincidental. you can bet on that. >> heather: coming up the latest reaction from the white house to the turmoil
. and everybody in gaza will be committed because egypt is brokering this. the egyptians can do that. and they're the only ones who can do that, actually. >> what is your assessment of the u.s. role in all of this? do you believe the president, president obama, is doing enough to try to achieve a cease-fire? >> i'm sure he is. i'm sure he's engaged with the egyptians and the turks, with the europeans, engaged with us. but the key here is -- i think the egyptians -- i spoke to some of their officials this afternoon, they are exerting every possible effort there is in order to reach a comprehensive cease-fire. i think they can achieve it. provide the guarantees for all sides. >> is the palestinian authority -- what i'm hearing, i think the answer is yes. but you tell me. is the palestinian authority -- you're associated with the president, mahmoud abbas, on the same page right now with hamas in gaza? >> look, today, we are not the authority. we are all palestinians, wolf. it is our people. we know we want to reach peace. that's our ticket to security and peace. unfortunately, we have been unable
'll also visit egypt and the west bank city of ramallah. and while the two sides are trading cease-fire proposals, israel's ambassador tells erin burnett his country is ready to launch a full-scale ground invasion. we talk to our reporter in phnom penh. she's been following the secretary of state. she departed just a few minutes ing aheaded to the middle east. good morning, jessica. what can you tell us about the secretary of state's mission? >> reporter: hi, john. good morning. the secretary of state is headed now to israel, ramallah and egypt to see if she can work with those three partners to try -- well, not partners -- but those three interests to see if she can help fashion some sort of a cease-fire. her trip was announced here in cambodia by a white house official, ben rhodes, with the national security council. and he made it very clear that in the white house's view, the primary onus is on hamas to take the first step in starting this truce by stopping their rocket fire into israel. listen to what he had to say. >> the bottom line still remains that hamas has to stop this
situation. president obama talked to the leaders of israel and egypt and we are told secretary of state clinton has been working the phones trying to muster international pressure to diffuse the situation rockets have been flying both ways. that was an israeli missile strike right there in gaza. israel is aiming at terrorist targets and that's what it looks and sounds like from a distance. here it is up close during an interview with ani israeli and palestinian who are in the thick of it. >> let me jump in there, mohammed. when you hear him describe the situation where he is, what goes through your mind? >> sorry. that is one thing. carry on with your question. [ indiscernible ] >> the palestinian health minister says at least 30 people have been killed in gaza, 300 wounded. many of them children and women. he says we can't independently verify those numbers. cnn's sara sidener has seen the missiles up close and is reporting in very dangerous conditions. >> we have to leave this area now because there are air strikes, and we can hear the planes and we've also seen rockets coming from a
of the engineering department at a cairo university to become president of egypt last year. it's really an intriguing story. morsi replaced, as you know, president hosni mubarak who had been in power for three decades and was one of israel's few allies in the region and morsi ran as the muslim brotherhood's candidate and he promised to implement islamic law. but analysts say that he's not really a true religious fundamentalist. that he had to adopt those positions to fend off competition from islamist extremists. and his background does seem to suggest that he may be more of a moderate. at least he spent eight years in the united states. he's earned a ph.d. in engineering from usc before he joined the faculty at cal state university north ridge. in fact, two of his five children were actually born during that time and those kids are u.s. citizens. but his links to this country certainly are going to be put to the test tomorrow when secretary of state hillary clinton joins the peace talks. she actually landed in tel aviv to
, president obama, has called and talked to the president of egypt, morsi, three times now in the last 24 hours. really trying to put a u.s. stamp, footprint, if you will, on the negotiations. how much leverage does the u.s. have in actually making sure that the cease-fire is something that's going to hold? >> well the u.s. doesn't have much leverage over hamas because the u.s. doesn't deal with hamas. the u.s. government, previous governments, regards hamas as a terrorist organization. when secretary of state hillary clinton visits here in jerusalem later, then goes to ramallah to meet with mahmoud abbas tomorrow and then goes to cairo she's not going to meet with anyone from hamas. the u.s. does have leverage on egypt, given the economic and military assistance the u.s. provides to egypt and given the dire economic straits that the egyptians are in right now. so the u.s. has leverage on the egyptians and obviously the u.s. has very good relations with israel. so the u.s. is a key player in all of this. but as far as leverage on hamas, u.s. leverage is limited. >> secretary of state hill
confrontation between israel and the palestinians has a new dimension tonight. egypt's new islamist government is promising to stand by the palestinians and is telling israel to end its air strikes on gaza. this as palestinians fire rockets at jerusalem and israel calls up 16,000 reservists, increasing the likelihood of a full scale ground war. correspondent david lee miller is near the israel-gaza border tonight. >> for the third day in a row, israelis ran from cover fired by palestinian militants in controlled gaza. more than 150 attacks were launched in the southern israel, that caused panic and destruction, but no fatalities. for the first time in the current conflict, air raid sirens were heard in jerusalem where two rockets apparently landed in empty fields outside of the city and the second day in a row, israel's largest city tel aviv was under attack, and a rocket in an unpopulated area, the rockets fired by palestinian militants now put more than 4 million israelis in their cross hairs, at this tel aviv cafe, it was business as usual after the air raid sirens stopped. >> my first reac
headquarters. >> it's a move threatening to plunge egypt into the kind of turmoil not seen since the fall of former egyptian leader mubarek. protestors saying morsi has declared himself the new faro and they are calling for a change in egypt's ruling regime. steve hair again is live from kie rope. >> the number of protestors building once again behind me. the number of several,000. we have seen squirm michiganis through out t-- skirmishes toda. it has been a cat and mouse game through out the day with police charging and retreating to come back a short time later. they are using large concrete blocks to build walls and protecting government buildings as well. two things to keep an eye on. they say they will not go back to work until the president repeals his decree a decree that puts him beyond the reach of the court so it could shut down prosecutions across the country. the egyptian stock market plunged 10 percent today. such a dramatic plunge has not been seen since mubarek was over thrown one year ago. >> thank you very much for that live report from cairo. >> it has been nearly two ye
. all of this is happening and secretary of state clinton has gone to egypt and the west bank helped broker a cease-fire deal. joining us now is michael oren who is is really ambassador to the united states it's great to have you with us today. >> good to be with you too, jenna. jenna: what information you have about the bombing? >> we don't know who is responsible yet, but we do know that hamas is celebrating. giving out candy to children, you can go on youtube and see that hamas supporters saying that they want more israeli body bags. it is about genocidal groups in gaza trying to kill the maximum number of israelis, while we are trying to defend ourselves and reduce the palestinian civilian casualties to the greatest extent that we can. the terrorists are digging in behind us million population. jenna: how has the cease fire talks been going? >> they have not been going well. they are discussing a long-term arrangement to put in a mechanism that prevent hamas from shooting at our population and paralyzing half the country. also stopping iran from smuggling long-range missiles into
often count on egypt to try to calm the chaos. this time it's a new egypt with a new leader and that could mean new complications for the u.s. and israel. a look at that coming up inside the fox report. >>> here at night fall, the search is on. the coast guard look for two missing oil rig workers. we reported for hours on this friday the news as it was breaking on the explosion off the coast of louisiana. that platform burned. the fire is out now. it happened in the gulf of mexico about 25 miles southeast of grand isle. houston-based black elk energy confirmed all of this. hospital officials in new orleans saying they're treating four workers who are in critical condition with second and third degree burns over much of their bodies. the coast guard reports using helicopters and boats now to try to find the workers who were still missing. this comes just one day after oil giant bp agreed to felony charges and a record $4.5 billion settlement for the 2010 deep water horizon disaster. phil keating with the news live from south florida now. what triggered today's fire? >> it app
that is now unfolding in egypt, where just hours ago, the country's highest judicial body calling for a national strike. the protest of a prove by the president there, mohammed morsi granting himself sweeping new powers, a move that since resulted in the violent and widespread protests they've seen. and steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo with the latest. where do the protests go from here? >> rick, the numbers are down today from what we saw on friday and we're likely to see more large scale protest demonstrations in the coming days, after sunday morning prayers and again on tuesday. what we're likely to see then are really competing margins, those who support the president, who feel like his moves are necessary, to break the log jam and to move the country forward and those who think that the president is trying to achieve a dictatorship. those who are trying to block him. so we're going to see more large scale protests and the other things to watch resignation is, three presidential aides have recently resigned in the past two hours and the judges are refusing, so if it
in egypt after negotiations break down between president morsi and judicial officials and people are are taking to the streets. >>> lawmakers back to work in the u.s. priority number one, avoiding the fiscal cliff. the left and right are talking compromi compromise. and the u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, headed to c p capitol hill to meet with her most outspoken critics, answer questions about what happened in benghazi. benghazi. let's go "outfront." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good evening. "outfront" tonight, egypt on edge. is a new dictatorship on the horizon? tonight, president morsi clarified, but really largely stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping powers. including freedom from judicial review for what he's calling presidential decisions. the announcement was made today after morsi met with members of egypt's judicial body, which has been very critical of his position and u.s. officials who were praising the new leader for his role in negotiating a cease fire between israel and hamas, well now when he took all these powers away from judge
and of the opposition. >> brown: then, we update the growing unrest in egypt where the islamist-dominated assembly fast-tracked a vote on a new constitution. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. tonight, arizona republican, jeff flake. >> >> we're at a point on the fiscal issues where we have to reach an agreement and perhaps as we do so that will start the stage for the other areas as well. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a minnesota non- profit that celebrates diversity and the power of dance. >> they're one of the few companies that within their own work spans so many kinds of different style, from classical ballet to modern dance to contemporary performance to urban dance. >> suarez: and we look at college sports teams, moving from conference to conference, playing a game of musical chairs where the end goal is more money from lucrative tv contracts. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connect
maceda, you were in cairo the announcement came from there. egypt is being given credit for having at least brokered this deal or godfathered this deal. what are the terms? do we know anything more about the terms of the cease-fire? >> well, we know that there was no formal agreement. that's the key thing here. this means that israel and hamas had reached an understanding, a kind of exchange of quiet for quiet, and that this will be the first phase of a deal. that will be followed by a second phase in days or weeks or months of much more intense negotiations. those talks will be anchored by and guaranteed by egypt, but with the strong participation of the united states to resolve key demands on both sides which are still out there. the main demand from hamas who wants the block aid of gaza lifted immediately, that is not going to happen, the israelis want an immediate end to all smuggling of arms and to gaza and the sinai, that has not happened either. they have agreed to these demands but need to work that out. >> stephanie gosk, you're in israel where we've experienced -- they've
but while preparing israeli troops are gathering on the border. even as egypt works to broker a deal, former british prime minister tony blair traveled to tel aviv to sit down with israeli president perez. >> i hope that over the coming days we can achieve cessation on a basis that is sustainable. >> and joining me now from gaza, nbc news foreign correspondent ayman. what's the latest on what's happening in cairo? >> good afternoon, tamron. well egyptian officials have met with the leaders of the two major palestinian factions engaged in this military operation with israel. they're trying to get them to commit to a cessation of hostility force a period of 48 hours to allow for a longer truce to go into effect. the palestinians feel they have the upper hand here, and they are saying they will not stop their attacks into southern israel so long as israel maintains a siege on gaza. they want it lifted and they want guaranteed backed by the international community that israel will no longer engage and target and kill senior leaders of the palestinian factions here in gaza. they wa
leadership and leadership in egypt to try and come up with a truce, one that she describes as being durable. shannon? >> shannon: we'll talk more with the panel about that, david. thank you. the violence in the middle east is stealing thunder from president obama's asian visit and interrupting outgoing secretary of state hillary clinton's farewell tour. here is chief white house correspondent ed henry. >> secretary of state hillary clinton plunged right in to the last minute shuttle diplomacy. rushing from campodea to jerusalem. to meet with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. >> america's commitment to israel's security is rock solid. and unwavering. that is why we believe it is essential to deescalate the situation in gaza. >> after a short rest, clinton will now head to ramallah early wednesday to meet with palestinian president mahmoud abbas. before flying out to cairo to consult with egyptian president mohammed morsi at the center of the efforts to bring durable cease-fire. the violence in gaza was jeff shadowing president obama's trip to asia, which was supposed to be a calm sw
on it, the interesting thing which didn't happen before is that egypt, the leading player in getting this cease-fire is a guarantor of the cease-fire, that was something that israel wanted and hamas wanted as well. but israeli officials told me in jerusalem, they didn't want to go into another nebulous cease-fire, they wanted real partners as they said to guarantee it, and if there is a problem and somebody has been violating it, they can go and talk to the guarantor, so that is a bit of a change as well. >>> christianne amanpour, thank you. >>> u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon says long-term solutions are necessary to address the underlying causes of conflict. joining me now is michael orin, the ambassador to the united states from israel. we heard about residents along the gaza border who are doubtful about the ability long term to maintain the cease-fire and live up to the agreements and make progress on agreements. how can you guarantee that hamas will not use this and other groups like islamic jihad as an opportunity to rearm, to restock supplies of sophisticated weapons we ha
. and the interesting thing again here which didn't happen before is that egypt, the leading player in getting this cease-fire, is a guarantor of the cease-fire, that is something that israel wanted, and egypt. israel told me in jerusalem they don't want to go into a nebulous cease-fire, they think if there is a problem, they can go and talk to the guarantor. so that, i think, is a bit of a change, as well. >> all right, christiane amanpour, appreciate talking to you tonight, thank you. >>> and netanyahu warning there could be additional problems if that doesn't lead to security. u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon says there are other issues necessary to address the conflict now. michael, we have heard from a lot of israelis tonight, particularly in the border regions along the gaza border who are very concerned and very doubtful about hamas's ability, long-term to maintain the cease-fire. to live up to the agreements and make progress on these agreements. how can you guarantee that hamas will simply not use this and other groups, like islamist jihad, to re-arm, to re-stock their supplies of s
of that craziness. >> the new protest out of egypt this morning because what started out as some protests in tahrir square has spilled over to other parts of the country. this all comes after thursday's decrees from egyptian president mohammed morsi basically saying you know that judiciary that we have? you know the judges that we have? if i make a decision, they are not going to be able to review anything that i do anymore. essentially cutting out the judiciary becoming by all accounts a dictator. >> yeah. all the checks on his power were essentially removed. and it did appear that this guy became a dick day or two overnight. what was worrisome about it is how quickly it all happened. and basically a 12 to 24 hour span after the united states congratulated mohammed morsi on doing such a great job helping to broker a peace agreement between hamas and israel which may beer maybe not. maybe he did a great job. there are also arms being smuggled through egypt so maybe he got too much credit. >> he seized the day. his name is on top of all newspapers. here i am, i need to consolidate power this morning
positioned along the border with gaza. a visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister failed to stop the bombardment and pull the region from the brink of all-out war. u.s. officials blame hamas for starting this conflict. but they are also urging to be measured in its response. the defense secretary leon panetta says israel and the palestinians need to negotiate a more permanent piece -- his words, a more permanent piece in the region. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr's been watching what's going on. barbara, what is the u.s. military most concerned about right now? >> wolf, as they watch that call-up of 75,000 israeli reservists, that is the concern. is this leading to a ground war? we've talked to officials here who say the major concern israel will move in on the ground. and that will be a significant escalation that will reverberate throughout the region. so here's the calculation. how far will hamas go in continuing its rocketed mortar attacks into israel? they know that if they pull back, the israelis presumably will pullback and this dangerous escalation can be avoide
jazeera reporting that the ceasefire is going to be announced this evening in cairo. now egypt will reportedly be agreeing to oversee this plan which is said to include an easing of the crossroads into gaza. so peace appears to be eminent but what do you make of the transparency of what the outline of it deal is? >> well, i think we still need to see it implemented. having spent a lot of time in the middle east, done a lot of negotiations, one thing i know about this part of the world, nothing is concluded until you actually see it carried out. it's one thing to talk about it. it's something else to do it. so let's actually see the ceasefire take hold. what i'm hearing is that by midnight their time, which would be around 5:00 our time, that's when it might actually take hold. so if it does, that will be the first step. then the question will be how real is it, number one. number two, what are its real elements? if there is some easing of movement into gaza, what are the commitments that hamas is undertaking to ensure there will not only be no fire out of gaza but also is there
. hillary clinton has just arrived in egypt where she will hold talks with egyptian president morsi about a possible truce in gaza. clinton already has met with palestinian president abbas and ramallah and israeli print minister benjamin netanyahu in jerusalem. we go to gaza city where we're joined by "democracy now!" course on sharif abdel kouddous. this latest article was just published by "the nation." explain how you got into gaza and what is happening there now. >> i got in through the rafah border crossing, the only border that bosra has to the outside world not controlled by israel. i had to wait three days on the border to get in from egypt, but i eventually did. it is really a dystopian reality, one of raleigh -- widespread violence and suffering. there is heavy naval bombing with the buzz of the drones overhead that really gives you the feeling of being under constant threat. you can hear the outgoing rockets being fired into israel. the streets are quite empty, shops are closed, there's a heavy tension in the air. last night, talks of a cease- fire were under way. it was partic
to prevent a ground war. she met with israeli and minutian leaders and with egypt's president who led the negotiations. she did not meet with hamas leaders because the u.s. does not deal directly with the militant group. so gint acted as a go-between. today, second clinton announced they had a deal. >> the united states will with partners across the region to consolidate this progress, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. >> tonight, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu says he will consider more severe military action if the cease-fire does not last. we have team fox coverage. david lee miller live inside southern israel but first to steve harrigan. he is live tonight in caro. what are the terms of the deal exactly? >> trace, three basic points coming out of this cease-fire agreement. first a cessation of hostilities on all sides. for israel that means they will no longer target members of hamas. for hamas it means they will no longer fire rockets into israel. second. a cooling off period of 24 hours. this will be a closely watch
on the show. >> thank you. >> eliot: a new constitution in egypt and a seat at the table for palestine. mints called mints? answer in a moment. >> eliot: when news first broke the makers of twinkies were going out of business, too many people assumed it was the same old story. union workers demanding exorbitant wages. let's take a look at what the management at hostess has been up to over the last few years. they've sold the company three times since the 1980s each time losing assets and picking up debt. leading to two bankruptcy filings in the last ten years. the ceo's salary was tripled earlier this year. now as a parting shot, they just gave us our number of the day. $1.8 million. that's how much hostess wants to pay just in bonuses to 19 of their top executives. on average, each executive would get nearly $100,000 on top of their normal salary to help wind down a company that failed under their watch. but there's no point in picking on hostess. this kind of mentality has become common. the average pay for an american ce
billions of dollars to egypt in fresh aid when president morsi is becoming a dictator before our very eyes? we'll talk about that, why that money might be better spent at home. "piles of money" coming up. ♪ look, if you have copd like me, you know it can be hard to breathe, and how that feels. copd includes chronic onchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copsymptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintance treatment that does both. spiriva handiher tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urinating, or an enlarged prostate. these may worsen with spiriva. discuss all medicines you take, even eye drops. stop taking spira and seek immediate medical help if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, vision changes or eye pa, or problems passinurine. other side effects include dry mouth and cotipation. nothing can reverse copd spira helps me breathe
of government and that our impression is that the presidency, the foreign ministry, the other agencies of egypt have worked together cohesively with in relation to hamas and to israel to try to bring about a ceasefire. so we have to support their efforts. >> dr. julian lewis. >> does the foreign secretary agree that the greater stride towards peace was when president sadat signed the treaty between egypt and israel, and does he, therefore, share my disappointment of the statement recently by president morrissey of -- morsi of egypt that the president situation is an act of aggression solely by the israelis? >> well, while that statement is different from what he or i might say about the origins of this, nevertheless, i hope my honorable friend will bear in mind the answer i gave to the previous question about the very constructive role being played by egypt. my experience and the prime minister's experience in meeting president morsi is that he wants a peaceful future for his country, he has not turned against the peace treaty with israel. he knows the importance of now building up the economy
alert. more trouble in the middle east. this is in cairo, egypt. you can see the teargas wafting through the streets as protestors take to tahrir square and other places to protest against that country's new president, mohammed morsi. he has just assigned himself sweeping new powers. this comes after he helped broker that peace between -- that cease-fire between hamas and israel. perhaps thinking that he is suddenly a leader on the world stage he decided to announce that all of the decisions he has made since assuming office in january cannot be challenged by the egyptian courts. as you can see a number of especially young people in egypt none too pleased about this. they have been protesting in cairo and alexandria and other places. morsi of course an islamist, a member of the muslim brotherhood, the ideological ally of hamas. it is yet to be seen what the response will be from the obama administration to these new powers that he has awarded himself. he has also ordered a new trial for his predecessor hosni mubarak. we will continue to watch the troubles developing inee lit up and the p
for example in egypt the brotherhood may be very reluctant on certain aspects of the security sector they're dealing with the military privileges of the military but other areas, for example, police, basic police reform and abuses and behavior of police i think my question and the brotherhood would be happy to see this corrected and improved, but that there is a perception within the brotherhood by many in the egyptian government institutions that if you were to address these issues it would result in its short term increase in crime and stability and they feel as though they can either fight crime effectively where they could address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need
of the replenishing of arms going into gaza. i think there is probably from the hamas side with egypt as egypt is probably promising the opening of passages which up until now at the descriptions have not really opened. and there may be something to do with what the israelis will be allowing into gaza, the fact is the israelis allowed much more into gaza, they still want to be able to check ships to be sure that big weapons aren't coming in that way but i think that is probably the outline that hamas probably also wants commitments from the israelis about not going after their leadership. >> elliott, do you think this is a deal that the israelis will believe in and think acceptable for them? >> i do. i think one really critical part of it is the egyptian side, that is policing that border, something that the number rec regime did not do. the egyptians will promise to do that and the question then is, will the new government do it? and keep at least the long range iranian rockets from entering gaza? will they really police it and really close the tunnels i think that is going to be quite criti
egypt's president, trying to broker a truce. minutes ago he declared that israel will soon halt its air strikes on gaza. along egypt's border with gaza, reza sayeh. tell us more. >> reporter: we don't want to jump to conclusions. we should be very cautious. there are growing signs from where we are standing in egypt that there could a closing in on a truce or cease fire. latest sign is a statement made by egyptian president mohamed morsi, according to state tv. he said that, quote, israeli gra aggression would end on tuesday. that, of course, is today. that's consistent with similar statements we've heard from other officials late last night. we spoke with a senior egyptian official and he told us he's optimistic that in the next 24 hours there would be a cease fire. hamas officials are being even more specific. senior hamas official telling cnn that israel has agreed to the general terms but rejected the timing. hamas conditions, according to an official, are this. stop the air operation, air assaults and want the ground crossings, blockades to be opened up immediately. according to th
in the past two days. three died yesterday from rocket fire. egypt dispatched its prime minister to gaza to show support for the palestinian people and hamas today. he met with hamas's prime minister about the casualties on the ground. he visited a hospital, showed emotion over the death of a 1-year-old boy. he also read a verse from the koran and later egypt's president mohammed morsi gave a fiery speech in support of the palestinian people on state tv. listen. >> we support the people of gaza. what hurts them, hurts us. >> hate and violence between the israelis and palestinians was sparked by this. israel's assassination of hamas's military chief on wednesday. an assassination that israel called necessary because of increased rocket attacks from gaza into israel the last several weeks. our senior international correspondent ben wiederman has been covering the middle east. you've been covering it for decades now. when you see israel moving hundreds of troops to the border of israel and gaza and saying it's going to call up 16,000 more reservists, what does that sound like they're prepar
the crisis in egypt or push that country into further chaos. that is one of our big stories. we're glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon:. i'm jon scott. the first elected leader, president mohammed morsi expected to come face-to-face with senior judges in egypt who say his power grab has gone too far. there are indications that the both side are trying to find some middle ground. morsi's maneuver unleased a rage of protests that continues to rage across the country. meanwhile the u.s. embassy in cairo says there are sporadic clashes between protesters and police near its entrance. we're told some rocks landed inside the walls of that huge compound. embassy officials say there is no indication they are the target. egypt wields enormous influence in the middle east peac process. that power demonstrated by brokering the cease-fire between is rainfall and hamas. steve care began streaming live too cairo with the latest developments right now. steve? >> reporter: jon, this is a key meeting between egypt's president and the chief justices in cairo. already there are hints from the president's
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